BATMAN: HIS REAL ORIGIN

the Wanderling


BATMAN COMICS, JUNE - JULY 1948 ISSUE #47














The above multi-page Origin of Batman story showed up in the June - July 1948, #47 issue of Batman Comics, the Batman character having successfully appeared in that stand alone Batman Comic since the Spring of 1940, starting with Issue #1. Before Batman rose high enough up in the overall scheme of things to support his own comic book, he had been slowly proving himself in another DC publication, Detective Comics, and had been doing so with single stories since his very first appearance in the May 1939 issue #27. However, the above multi-page origin story in Batman Comics notwithstanding, so touted as being the "real" original Batman origin story, there did appear in Detective Comics #33 about nine years before as found in Volume I, dated November 1939 a brief two-page segment outlining the story. Those two pages can be reached by clicking the following image or link:



BATMAN'S VERY FIRST TRUE AND REAL TWO ORIGIN PAGES

Batman holds the distinction of being important to me comic book wise for a number of reasons, but the two of the strongest stand out reasons involved time travel and Leonardo Da Vinci, and a single super strong captivating eye gaze sequence from his origin story.

Throughout my works I make mention how comic books played a big role in my early childhood. My older brother was three years my senior, in turn starting school three years before me. During those three years he was learning to read as part of his regular educational format as he moved from one grade to the next. In the process two things happened. One, my mother helped him in his reading-learning skills, and two I learned to read right along with him, actually being able to read his third grade books as well as him if not better by the time I entered kindergarten. The difference being he had regularly assigned books to read related to his classroom assignments while I, not being in school yet, didn't. So, to satisfy a certain unmet reading hunger I turned to comic books.

The two panel comic book graphic below is from the June-July 1948, issue #47 of Batman Comics we are dealing with here. In the two panels below, as found on page 4 above, young Bruce Wayne just witnessed the death of his parents by the cheap back alley thug so depicted. At the top of the second of the two panels Bruce Wayne and the thug make eye contact with the text written blurb describing the intensity of that contact. I was around ten years old when issue #47 hit the stands and by then, at least peripherally, having become a dyed-in-the-wool Batman fan. That particular comic panel stuck with me, always reminding me of the art work of Salvador Dali, with the background story of the eye sequences leading up to still this day. To see the historical aspect as well as how actual eye contact sequences impacted things in my life please click the following image followed by the all important Da Vinci links:



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THE BATMAN AND LEONARDO DA VINCI, BATMAN COMICS, APRIL-MAY 1948 ISSUE #46
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As for Batman and Da Vinci, if they ever showed up together again at any length I'm not aware of it, but for me in the story above that they did show up, for me it couldn't have been better timed if Destiny had done it herself. Remember, from the very beginning the creator of Batman Bob Kane had Batman seeped in Da Vinci:





FIFTEEN CHAPTER 1943 MOVIE THEATER SERIAL
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1949 BLACK AND WHITE BATMAN AND ROBIN MOVIE
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CAPTAIN MARVEL: HIS ORIGIN


CAPTAIN MIDNIGHT

THE GREEN LAMA

BUCK ROGERS
HIS HISTORY AND EVOLUTION


E-MAIL
THE WANDERLING

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SO, DID THE WANDERLING FLY?

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As to the subject of donations, for those of you who may be interested in doing so as it applies to the gratefulness of my works, I invariably suggest any funds be directed toward THE WOUNDED WARRIOR PROJECT and/or THE AMERICAN RED CROSS.
















Primarily because of the ages of the comic books and what has come down to us as being available, both of the origin pages as presented have been cleaned-up, remastered, and sanitize for our purposes here. However, how they appear in their original form can be seen by clicking the graphics.


Although both the longer multi-page version and shorter two page version of the origin story were drawn and created by the same artist and creative team they were done so many years apart. I've presented the final three panels back-to-back, above, as a comparison to the slight differences between the two.

Below are two panels from the same Detective Comics #33, Volume I, November 1939. Although there are a couple of brief pages at the very beginning of the story dedicated to Batman's origin, the story continues along into other things. Interestingly enough, notice that at that early stage of Batman's development he was armed with a pistol, holster and all. Not only that, he uses it.


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