THE LOWDOWN ON LANA LANG


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VERSION I




THE LOWDOWN ON LANA LANG: VERSION II




THE LOWDOWN ON LANA LANG: VERSION III








Lana Lang, Superboy's friend from childhood into adolescence and then into adult life was the first person to suspect Clark Kent and Superboy was one and the same person. Her first appearance was in the September-October 1950 issue of SUPERBOY NO.10 in "The Girl in Superboy's Life." Afterwards in SUPERMAN 78/3 from September-October 1952, as an adult woman, she moves to Metropolis and works at the Daily Planet with Clark Kent, and even for a few days, lives in Lois Lane's apartment. Lana Lang as adult, is Lois Lane's chief rival for Superman's love in several adventures. In 1965 she becomes a TV reporter (SUPERMAN 177/2). In the post-Crisis version by John Byrne, Lana Lang is Clark Kent's close friend, being the first person who knows his secret identity as Superman.(see)


As can be determined from the above history of Lana Lang, you can see, as a comic book character in Superman and Superboy comics, she did not show up for the first time until Superboy No. 10 with a cover date of September-October 1950, some two years AFTER the event with the cab-forwards and the flight out of the dirt airstrip south of Reno as mentioned in both June Lang and Riding the Cab Forewards linked below. As written in both it seems as though I put the two Langs, June and Lana, together at that moment at that same time. It was after I became aware of Lana Lang that I was able to recall backwards that the woman was June Lang. The fact the woman may have been the movie actress June Lang on the plane was brought up to my grandmother by my uncle early on, he knowing that my mother and June Lang had danced together as children professionally. Between my grandmother, uncle and I, the whole June Lang thing was kept alive on-and-off long enough for me to make the connection with the red haired Lana Lang on my own sometime in the 1950s, the 12 year old boy or so that I was, and from there I extrapolated it clear up to the point I felt I knew about the connection my whole life.


RED HAIRED WOMEN IN A YOUNG BOY'S LIFE

I was never much of what you would call a Superman fan, comic book wise, when it came to super heroes, leaning more toward the more vulnerable human mortal types such as Captain Midnight, Batman, and a little off center for a super hero, the Spirit. I also, it must be said, leaving a large amount of latitude or leeway for the "World's Mightiest Mortal," Captain Marvel.

Not particularly being a Superman fan had a tendency to kind of leave Lana Lang out of the spotlight for me as well. Even though it didn't matter much because she was so low profile, she did in fact as she was presented, have red hair. So what? Well there just happen to be two red haired female comic book characters that were very high up on the spectrum for me. Firehair and Jane Martin, War Nurse. Firehair shows up in a lot of what I write, me seeming to have devoted a lot of coverage and mentions of her on a number of my pages and throughout my internet online works.

In how the story line of Firehair was written, she was found in the wilderness of the wild west in dire straights and saved by members of the Native American Dakota tribe. In several places, in conjunction with Firehair I write that my mother, who died while I was a very young boy, and her sister, my Aunt, had beautiful long red hair. In that they were so close together age-wise and looked so much alike almost everybody mistook them for twins. Although I do not remember much about my mother I remember my aunt very well, and because of their look alikeness I always felt I had a good idea of what my mother looked like. In conjunction with Firehair, as a young boy I always held a certain affinity towards her character because I liked to believe that my mother, with her red hair and all, would have been like her, maybe even, since I never went to her funeral, found by Indians and saved.

A number of readers of my works, some tongue-in-cheek some obviously more serious in their tone, some leaning towards a certain creepiness even, have a tendency to read more into what I have written about my mother and Firehair than any intention included or not included in my meaning therein. Although I do not particularly recall thinking about it while writing what I have regarding Firehair, nor do I recall thinking of it previously, now that it has been brought to my attention I do get a kick out of the tongue-in-cheek side, not so much so the other side. Their attention is directed toward a time when Firehair was a priority in my life. Since there IS a sort of a sensuous Sheena, Queen of the Jungle look about her, as the virile young boy I was growing up, they ask, was my application of interest in Firehair superimposed over my own mother more Oedipus in nature than otherwise?

Jane Martin, on the other hand just never received the amount of "screen time" like Firehair because unlike Firehair I didn't relate her to my mother, which in turn brought in all the Oedipus Complex comments, followed then by a superfluous need to reply. Nor, like I have written rather extensively on in Firehair, was I reading about her at anytime that the woman of the couple I was fostered to threw a fit causing me to run away from home. None of those things. Her stories were published in the comic book Wings monthly and I simply read them and moved along --- except for one occasion in my works where she got caught up in an adventure that involved the Flying Tigers. That story I made a full site on. Like, was she hot or what:



JANE MARTIN, WAR NURSE MEETS THE FLYING TIGERS
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FIREHAIR: THE QUEEN OF THE SAGEBRUSH FRONTIER
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RETURN TO:

JUNE LANG, ACTRESS


RIDING THE CAB FORWARDS


ANALOGIES IN TIME AND PLACE



CAPT. PAT PARKER, WWII WAR NURSE, GIRL COMMANDO
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THEIR HISTORY

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E-MAIL
THE WANDERLING

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