PRAJNA



the Wanderling


PRAJNA: The sixth of the Six Paramitas (perfections) in the Buddhist concept of the Bodhisattva path. It is referred to as “wisdom” or “understanding” that is capable of extinguishing afflictions and bringing about Enlightenment. Simply stated, it is the field of pure consciousness beyond concepts, beliefs and imaginations.


In Mahayana and Vajrayana traditions, Prajna means the realization of the emptiness of all phenomenal existence. At this stage (Bodhisattva path), the individual would have reached the stage of sainthood and could have entered Nirvana if he so wished. However, out of compassion, this entry is prolonged and deferred to a time when all suffering beings have already been led towards enlightenment. Prajna is therefore balanced by Karuna (compassion) which is the part and parcel of the conception of wisdom. This motivates the perfection of wisdom – which is the conceptualization of the first five qualities of the Six Paramitas (giving, morality, patience, vigor, meditation).(see)

The Prajna-paramita Sutras of the Mahayanas, such as the Heart Sutra and the Diamond Sutra, describes it as supreme, highest, incomparable, unequalled, and unsurpassed essence. Both traditions focuses a lot on “emptiness” while meditating.

For the Theravada Buddhists, Prajna means to gain an intuitive understanding of the Four Noble Truths, Dependent Origination and the Law of Karma. Insight or Vipassana Meditation, like the other traditions, is the means to attain such wisdom. Through diligent practice, the meditation reveals the inherent suffering, impermanence and absence of self in all phenomena thus leading one to see reality.


THE THREE STAGES OF PRAJNA


The Mahayanas are believed to be the first to effectively conceptualize the Prajna. There are three levels of Prajnas related to the practice of the Four Foundations of Mindfulness [i.e., 1.) the body, 2.) feelings, 3.) minds, and 4.) mental objects]. This Prajna of mindfulness is a three-stage process of development in the path of Buddhism – the Prajna of listening; the Prajna of contemplating; and the Prajna of meditation.


These according to the Sutta-Satipatthana are the Buddha’s teachings on the Four Foundations of Mindfulness, for attaining purity, overcoming suffering, and the realization of Nirvana.


AND NOW THIS:


"Buddhism teaches that after a practitioner achieves a certain degree of realization, spiritual power develops. A person at the level of an Arhat is said to possess six supernatural powers. Furthermore, it is acknowledged as well that supernatural powers are not attainable exclusively JUST by Buddhists and Buddhists only. It is possible for anyone who has deep religious and spiritual cultivation to develop some kind of 'super-normal powers.'"

NAGARJUNA: The Treatise on the Great Perfection of Wisdom (Dharmamitra Translation)


Anyone who finds themselves pursuing a casual to serious interest in Buddhism and Zen, especially so those seeking insights into spiritual Enlightenment a la Buddha and any relationship that exists thereof, it isn't long before they come face-to-face with some of the more esoteric aspects found in both religions, such as, for example, the super-normal perceptual states known as Siddhis, the mysterious hermitage said to exist somewhere beyond time in a remote area of the Himalayas known under a variety of names such as Gyanganj, Shambhala or Shangri-La, or the ability to fly.

Even though Buddhism and Zen are found to be deeply seeped in all three concepts, those who encounter one or the other individually or all, especially seekers on the path with a strong western background, although they may like the idea, they are usually uncomfortable with a formal acceptance of any possibility of reality for any or all, and quickly relegate or disregard such ideas into areas of forced silence.

The revered Indian spiritual teacher Sri H. W. L. Poonja (1910-1997), also known as Poonjaji or Papaji, a master in his own right, is considered in religious circles as the foremost disciple, devotee, follower or advocate of the Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi.

Anybody who holds themselves up to be anybody in the present day Advaita Vedanta come Enlightenment movement a la Ramana, but too young or not born in time to have studied under Ramana, had to have at one time bellied up to Poonja in some fashion or the other in order to flaunt their credibility. Regardless of his latter day followers and any credibility they may or may not radiate, Poonja himself was the real thing. The quote below is from his biography. He was not some ancient saint who somebody said somebody said they saw something, but a modern day personage that reported the following:


"In the last forty years or so I have met thousands of sadhus, swamis, gurus, etc. I have been to Kumbha Melas which millions of pilgrims attended; I have been to many of the big ashrams in India; I have toured the Himalayas, meeting many reclusive her­mits there; I have met yogis with great siddhis, men who could actually fly."


The Buddha is quite clear on the level of Attainment and criteria that MUST be met in order successfully set into motion such actions. A person cannot simply sit down meditating for a few minutes and then find themselves with the ability to fly off, for example, to someplace like the mysterious hermitage said to exist somewhere beyond time in a remote area of the Himalayas known under a variety of names such as Gyanganj, Shambhala or Shangri-La, re the following:


"The Buddha said 'If a monk should frame a wish as follows: 'Let me travel through the air like a winged bird,' then must he be perfect in the precepts (Sila), bring his thoughts to a state of quiescence (Samadhi), practice diligently the trances (Jhana), attain to insight (Prajna) and be frequenter to lonely places.'"

SIDDHIS: Supernormal Perceptual States


Simply put, for the practitioner to have the ability to fly he must be perfect in the precepts of Sila, Samadhi, Jhana, and Prajna. If the practitioner is not perfect in any one or all, no flying.

This page is on Prajna. When you are perfect in it's precepts move on to:

THE ZEN-MAN FLIES

Let Me Travel Through the Air Like a Winged Bird
(please click image)

SEE:

THE SUTRA OF THE 6th PATRIARCH, HUI NENG: Chapter II, On Prajna


THE CODE MAKER, THE ZEN MAKER
OF SHANGRI-LA, SHAMBHALA, GYANGANJ, BUDDHISM AND ZEN


ZEN ENLIGHTENMENT IN A NUTSHELL


30 MINUTES TO ENLIGHTENMENT


CODE OF ETHICS FOR SPIRITUAL GUIDES


SPIRITUAL GUIDES: PASS OR FAIL?


FALSE GURU TEST



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(source) BUDDHISM CONCEPTS (July 28, 2007)