HOEI SHIN


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FUSANG: THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA BY CHINESE
BUDDIST PRIESTS IN FIFTH CENTURY


From the Works of Charles Godfrey Leland

PRESENTED BY:
the Wanderling


The Chinese were very isolationist, 1500 years ago. China thought the outside world was benighted and uninteresting -- to be avoided and sealed off, not sought out. But a newer breed of Chinese Buddhists had a different view. Their business was to go out and convert all lands to Buddhism.

In AD 499, a Buddhist missionary, Hoei-Shin, came back from a long voyage and told of a strange people in a strange land -- 20,000 Chinese miles to the east. That would've put him right on the west coast of Mexico.

Hoei-Shin named the place Fusang, after a succulent plant he'd found in that arid land. The natives ate its roots and made wine from its sap. From its thick leaves they made cloth, rope, roof-thatch, and even paper. Hoei-Shin wrote about their society and folkways -- all very unlike anything Chinese.

Of course, the fusang plant sounds just like the Mexican maguey plant -- the Agave americana which served so many functions for the pre-Columbian natives of Mexico. And we have to ask: Is this another mystery of flying saucers or Bigfoot? Or can we take Hoei-Shin's journey as established historical fact?

A French scholar, Deguignes, wrote about Fusang in 1761. He had limited material, and his work kicked up a firestorm of controversy. A German professor, Neumann, published Hoei-Shin's narrative in 1841 along with a commentary. An American, Charles Leland, translated and expanded Neumann's work in 1875.

It was a long process of raising and resolving questions. Take the route: At first it seemed out of the question to cross the Pacific in a 5th-century Chinese junk. Then we see that circulating currents can take you from China, up the east coast of Japan, past Korea, along the Aleutians, south of Alaska, down the west coast of America to Mexico. The same currents carry you back to China on a westward path, just above the equator.

The very simplicity of that enormous journey is the most convincing argument of all. Since Leland's book, experts have thrashed out the details with little public notice. Anthropologists have found Chinese and Japanese influences and artifacts among Native Americans all the way south to Peru. It appears that what Hoei-Shin was able to do, others probably did as well.

None of this reaches the textbooks. And so we forget. We forget there was a Russian capital on our west coast before the Gold Rush. There was a university in Mexico City before Shakespeare. We forget that, just as the Roman empire fell, Chinese missionaries were preaching -- to pre-Aztec Mexicans.



THE FU SANG TRAIL

The Fu Sang Trail begins just north of present day Point Hueneme between Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, California where the Santa Clara River enters the Pacific. Following the stream eastward to the mountains you can easily continue right on up to the high desert floor picking up and following basically the same route as the Southern Pacific Railway tracks use today through Soledad Canyon, coming out just south of Palmdale. From there it is possible to cross the desert heading directly east hugging the base of the east-west transverse San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains until reaching the Mojave River where it exits onto the desert plain. Following the Mojave River north it eventually starts making a huge sweep toward the northeast. About 40 miles from your first contact with the river you reach a point near Yermo where it and an ancient trail used by Native Americans to traverse from the Colorado River to the sea, now called the Mojave Road, run side-by-side. Roughly 20 miles farther northeast and the trail turns more eastwards away from the Mojave River, eventually, after somewhat over a 100 miles across open desert, reaching the Colorado near present day Laughlin, Nevada.



ON THE LEFT OF THE MAP IS THE WORD CHUMASH. ABOVE THAT SANTA CLARA R. AND A DOTTED LINE LEADING
TO SOLEDAD PASS THEN TO MOJAVE RIVER. THAT IS THE BASIC ROUTE USED BY HUI SHEN TO THE COLORADO.


Hoei-Shin and a small entourage, after disembarking their ship moored somewhere around Point Hueneme but more specifically where the Santa Clara River exits into the Pacific, on foot with no animals of burden but most likely a few Indian guides, hiked eastward to and across the Mojave Desert for 300-400 miles. Why? The answer may well be because of five itinerant beggar-monks that were said to have preceded him. Nowhere has it been recorded how, when, or the amount of time any of the five monks had been in America before him, only that they were, although not all present at the same time. Like the Dali Lama, the Pope, or the Phantom, one replaced the other in a long line of secession creating in a sense a venerated holy man. Hoei-Shin turned inland to pay homage to that venerated holy man. The Buddha was reputed to have been born around 563 BCE and died around 483 BCE. By the time of Christ some 400 years or so later the Buddhist religion was well established and shown to be so, for example, as found in such Buddhist texts as the Hemis Manuscripts. So said, by the time Hoei-Shin showed up in America circa 458 AD there had been plenty of time to have established lineage. Or as stated above previously by Charles Leland, "Chinese missionaries were preaching to pre-Aztec Mexicans."


"Through the great canyon a large river flows from the north to the south and falls into the northern end of the Gulf of California. Now, in the useful translations of the Spanish authors of 1540 AD we find that the scribe of the Conquistadors placed near the Colorado River, in a small island, a sanctuary of Lamaisra, or of Buddhism. He mentions a divine personage living in a small house near a lake upon this island, and called, as he says, Quatu-zaca, who was reputed never to eat."

VOYAGES: l'Histoire de la D'couverte de l'Amerique, Vol IX, Henri Ternaux-Compans (1836)


In the above quote there is mention by the scribes of the Conquistadors of a small island in a lake placed in the Colorado River. That island is concluded to be the no longer in existent Cottonwood Island. Cottonwood Island was formed by a onetime lake created by a natural blockage some distance downstream that eventually became overcome releasing the main depth of the lake water to what became the more-or-less the normal outflow of the Colorado River. The island itself however still had sufficient water flow on either side of its banks to remain a viable intact island during the time of the Conquistadors and later European settlers. Today however, Cottonwood Island is completely submerged by Lake Mohave created by the manmade Davis Dam near Laughlin, Nevada. Lake Mohave in covering the island easily surpasses the width, length, and depth of the unnamed original lake that formed Cottonwood Island in the first place. As it was, none of the 1540s Spanish explorers, over land or by river, ever got much closer to Cottonwood Island than 40 miles if that. Anything they had to say was hearsay garnered from their Native American guides. It wasn't until the the white explorers, exploiters, miners, and settlers started showing up in the area that Cottonwood Island was actually accessed by them or began showing up on the radar. By then Quatu-zaca and any traces thereof were long gone.


It should be brought to the attention of the reader that Hoei Shin as found in the excerpt above and the text of the book proper by Charles G. Leland, linked below, is one and the same as Hui Shen as found in a variety of texts elsewhere. Hoei Shin as used by Leland is but one variation of the name identifying one individual (i.e., the same person being called by a number of variations of the same name, for example sometimes known as Hwui Shen).

He is called Hoei Shin and spelled as such in Chapter 4 of They All Discovered America (1961) by Charles Michael Boland, again as linked below, with Boland's and Leland's Hoei Shin being the same Hui Shen AND same personage whose memory from the ancient past, and recognizable until at least the recent times, that stood in the form of a monument or statue carved from virgin rock high in the mountains of a village north of Tehuantepec that bared the name Guixepecocha. Guixepecocha spelled phonetically being Wi-shi-pecocha with Wi-shi-pecocha a transliteration of Hui Shen, Bhikshu. Most if not all is found in the following link along with the Fu Sang Trail information presented above, which is more of a Henriette Mertz view from her book "Pale Ink:" than Leland. See:


BUDDHISM IN AMERICA BEFORE COLUMBUS


MYSTIC AZTEC SUN GOD

TIME TRAVEL, THE CURANDERO, AND MEETING QUATU-ZACA

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FUSANG: THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA BY CHINESE
BUDDIST PRIESTS IN FIFTH CENTURY


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HUI SHEN: BHIKSHU


HUI SHEN, BHIKSHU ABOVE
SAME AS BOLAND'S HOEI SHIN CHAPTER IV


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ANCIENT CHINESE IDEOGRAPHS IN NATIVE AMERICAN ROCK ART


PRE-COLUMBIAN EXPLORATION AND COLONIZATION OF THE NEW WORLD




THE FLYING MACHINE: CHINA, CIRCA 400 A.D.

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MAJOR HISTORICAL BUDDHIST MASTERS, ZEN ANCESTORS AND ZEN PATRIARCHS

Bodhidharma, Hui'ko, Hui Shen, Hui Neng, Shih-t'ou Hsi-ch'ien, Zhaozhou, Moshan Liaoran, Mugai Nyodai,
Nagarjuna, Ganapati Muni, Kuan Yin, Miao Shan, Tung-Shan, Lin Chi, Te Shan, Dogen



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