FLYING HUMANS AND THEIR ATTEMPTS TO DO SO




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EARLY FLYERS FROM ICARUS TO LILIENTHAL



the Wanderling


"From the beginning of time man has thought of flight --- history records man's feeble attempts through the years --- wings of wax, gliders and now the airplane --- but can he be master of the air until he himself can fly?"

WILL EISNER, from the Black Condor, 1940 (see)



photo source David Heger


From the very dawn of the human species, as they slowly tread their way heavily across one region to the next, dragging their belongings and families with them, only to see still yet another ever farther horizon in the distance beyond, some gazed toward the sky and yearned to fly. From that ingrained generation after generation desire becoming almost genetically innate I too gazed toward the sky. But, like a only a few before me, I did more than just gaze. I flew.

Starting from a very young age I had been known to jump off one-story porches, garages, and roof tops with a bed sheet made into a parachute or flaring behind my back tied to my wrists and ankles a la the glider chute of Captain Midnight on more than one occasion, So too, without any knowledge of same thereof or parental approval either, I designed and built bat-like wings similar to Icarus albeit with cloth and sticks and attempted to fly, all before my uncle, who helped me in later years, showed up on the scene.

In Codex Atlanticus, that refers to Leonardo Da Vinci's notes on the flight of birds, I write that my older brother who was born three years before I was, and because of being older, started school several years before I did. As he went from kindergarten through to the third grade my mother helped him with his reading. Even though I hadn't started school because of being too young, vying to garner as much if not more attention than he seemed to be receiving, I learned to read right along with him. By the time he reached third grade and I started kindergarten, I was reading third grade books probably as well or better than he was and was being shown off by my mother for being able to do so to anybody who would listen.

Two books I remember fondly right up to this day, both hardcover, that my mother and brother read over and over or I chose to read myself was one about Hoover Dam showing how it was constructed, it's inner workings with row after row of power generators and one with pages of black and white line drawings of Da Vinci's flying machines. Why either of those two books or the contents therein would standout so much in my memory relative to any other books we may have read is not known.

On the third page of ZEN ENLIGHTENMENT: The Path Unfolds, relating living with my artist Uncle some years following my mother's death, I write that it was under his auspices somewhere approaching or near age ten that I first heard of Leonardo Da Vinci. Actually, more clearly, after reading the comic book with the Da Vinci story 500 Years Too Soon, what happened was, when my Uncle began showing me pictures of Da Vinci's flying machines, I recognized them from my past as a preschool four or five-year old, I just didn't know (or remember) who Leonardo was or how the drawings related to him.

To my knowledge I have never seen a copy of the Leonardo Da Vinci book with the black and white line drawings of his flying machines that so impressed me as the young boy that I was reading with my mother and older brother, at least not so that it jogged my memory, and I have searched book after book for years hoping for just that experience. However, such is not the case regarding a comic book I somehow must have read, saw, or came into contact with when I was a very young boy.That comic book was WAR HEROES, No. 4, April-June 1943 which carried within it's contents the following related to Da Vinci:



WAR HEROES, DELL PUBLISHING CO., NO. 4, APRIL-JUNE, 1943
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Although at the time I may not have related the above to Leonardo Da Vinci I did relate it back to something else. One day, several years earlier, having not even reached school age yet, I was in the junk laden backyard workshop garage of the grandfather of the girl next door who used to babysit me like I often was. While there, I came across the following picture, below, in a publication of some kind the old man had been making a fuss over with a neighbor. The grandfather was big on Japanese invasion stuff, even to the point of monitoring shortwave radio all night long to having his own hand-cranked air raid siren. My dad was the air raid warden for our block while right along with him I was, albeit self ordained, a Junior Air Raid Warden, and even though I never quite got it, my dad and the old man didn't always see eye-to-eye regarding his constant false air raid warnings. In any case, I remember well the fuss between the neighbor and the grandfather involving the photograph. It was all about potential invasion, with the grandfather being adamant that "we should go to no ends to protect against invasion" and the neighbor not being in full agreement, even to the point of reaching a huge yelling match and the neighbor being thrown out of the shop because of being in league with the enemy.

Hearing all the commotion my my mother or grandmother came over and took me home and when I left, without realizing it, I still had the publication that had the photograph in it. At home all I did was look at it. Over and over I continued to look at the photo and all I could think about was a man with some kind of wing device designed to help make him fly.



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As you can see, well before the time of my first wayward flight so inspired by my own imagination or the glider scene as seen in Tarzan and the Huntress, I was already well on my way toward a fascination regarding the ability to fly, flying machines, giant flying creatures, giant feathers, et al, that seemed to dominate in later life, including the venerable World War II fighting machine, the P-40 Warhawk.



photo source David Heger

My uncle stated many times that he felt the reason for my fascination with flying and flying things went back to an incident that involved the fly over of a giant airborne object that I witnessed as a young boy. The object, of an unknown nature and an unknown origin and as large as a Zeppelin at over 800 feet in length, was seen by literally thousands of people along the coast of California barely three months into World War II. Known variously as the UFO Over L.A., The Battle of Los Angeles, etc., etc., or as I call it The Battle of Los Angeles: 1942 UFO. Even though the object was able to take over 1440 direct rounds of anti-aircraft fire and still escape unscathed, the incident is mostly forgotten now except by maybe myself and a few others. Actually, although the L.A. UFO no doubt had a major impact, I personally think what really capped my fascination regarding the ability to fly was born from a germ initiated from building, flying, and watching a glider-like paper flying toy with a penny in it's nose called the Flying Captain Marvel. Here was a man, not a plane flying, but a man. In my young mind I could see no reason for such a thing not to be able to be done.



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As for the Tarzan glider, the day I came running home after seeing the movie all jacked up and pleading almost non-stop with my uncle to help me build a flying craft capable of carrying me, initially he just sort of played along. After seeing Tarzan and the Huntress himself he was sure for a duplicate glider to even come close to working, even though the movie showed Johnny Sheffield, the actor who played Boy, holding the glider it never showed him using the glider (only Cheetah) it was quite clear relative to Sheffield's weight the wingspan and wing width was wrong --- which would prove true even for me, being the ten year old boy I was and probably half Sheffield's weight. It was only after my uncle saw how serious I was that we began researching Leonardo Da Vinci, eventually moving to building a glider based on a design called the Lilienthal Type IX.


ICARUS TO LILIENTHAL






EARLY DA VINCI FLYER CIRCA 1490 AD
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HEZARFEN AHMET CELEBI 1609-1640



HEZARFEN AHMET CELEBI'S 2 MILE FLIGHT ACROSS THE BOSPHORUS IN 1638
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WOMEN IN FLIGHT

On June 4, 1784 Madame Elisabeth Thible, a French opera singer, became the first woman to fly freely in an untethered balloon. The flight lasted 45 minutes with the balloon rising to a height of 8,500 feet, 20 minutes longer than her male counterparts at the time and three times higher.


FLYING MACHINE AS FLOWN SUCCESSFULLY BY DIEGO MARIN AGUILERA IN 1793

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IN 1837 ENGLISHMAN GEORGE CAYLEY BUILT A STREAMLINED AIRSHIP MECHANICALLY POWERED BY A STEAM ENGINE


LILIENTHAL FLYER CIRCA 1895


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Under the guidance of my Uncle and a seemingly unlimited supply of money provided through the graciousness and wealth of my Stepmother, I researched and studied everything I could find on Leonardo and his flying machines. My uncle and I read magazine articles, scoured used books stores, went to libraries, talked to professors, and even obtained what initially became our working 'bible,' a copy of The Mechanical Investigations of Leonardo da Vinci written by Ivor B. Hart and published in 1925. Then, gathering all the info, we put about building our own machine by combining our 1948 ideas with Leonardo's fifteenth century ideas and Otto Lilienthal's 1895 ideas of some four-hundred years later.


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THE WANDERLING'S FIRST FLIGHT USED A HAND-BUILT FLYING MACHINE FROM A LILIENTHAL DESIGN


Even though my uncle had stopped the design and construction of the flying machine we were working on because of some problems with my older brother, mainly inter-sibling rivalry, the stoppage, although it was only a minor blip in time, seemed like forever to me.

It wasn't long before my uncle discovered it wasn't worth all the effort he had to put forth to stop me, so not a whole lot of actual physical time elapsed before the two of us were back feet first into finishing it, with most of our difficulties in doing so stemming from stretching the fabric to a flight worthy satisfaction. Eventually we were able to complete the flyer to such a point we both felt it would actually work.

However, no real plans were set into motion to attempt a flight, and with no prospect in sight for doing so, one day, taking matters in my own hands and without my uncle's knowledge or approval, a friend of mine and I hauled it out of it's lair and up to the top of the second story apartments across the street, re the following:


"It was only a short time after returning from the desert during the summer of 1948 and just before school started at around age 10 or so, that I removed the flying machine my uncle and I built from the hanging position of it's construction lair and hauled it up to the rooftop of the second story building across the street. Then, holding onto the machine for dear life, I jumped off.

"At first the craft seemed easily able to maintain the same two-story height advantage over quite some distance. But then, partway into the flight, instead of continuing in the direction I wanted, it began tipping lower on the right and turning. Without ailerons or maneuverable rudder controls and with inexperienced over-correcting on my part creating an adverse yaw followed by a sudden stall, the ensuing results ended with a somewhat dramatic drop, crashing into the porch and partway through the front windows of the house diagonally across the way."(source)


As far as the "lack of flight controls mechanisms," unknown to me or my uncle at the time we were building the flying machine, the design we used was based on a Lilienthal model known as Type IX (9). If you take a good look at the graphic just below this paragraph as well as the cigarette trading card that we used to help design and build the craft as found in Footnote [1], you will notice the wing on the right between the 5th and 8th rib, there appears to be what looks like some wrinkles in the fabric. That damage was part of the results of the Type IX crashing, and doing so under almost the exact circumstances as my flyer --- with the same outcome. Little did my uncle and I know, with the information we had at hand, that the design we were using had stalled and crashed when Lilienthal flew it for the first time. If we had known, we could either used another design or taken into consideration safeguards to ensure the same results would not happen to us, i.e., me. See:


LILIENTHAL GLIDER TYPE IX (TYPE 9)




TO READ ABOUT THE FLYING FRONTIERSMAN AND
HIS DA VINCI-LIKE FLYING MACHINE CLICK IMAGE.


Fifty or sixty years following the Flying Frontiersman's fictional flight in the Autumn of 1771 using a flying machine based on a design by Leonardo Da Vinci circa 1490 AD and Madame Elisabeth Thible's real life untethered balloon flight of June 4, 1784, Count Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin, the inventor of the ultimate in lighter than air machines was born (1838-1917). On July 2, 1900, Zeppelin made the first flight with the LZ 1 in southern Germany. In comparison, the Wright brothers didn't make their first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft until December 17, 1903, two-and-a-half years after Zeppelin's maiden voyage.



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ZEPPELIN


ZEPPELINS: HIGH ALTITUDE WARSHIPS
THE HEIGHT CLIMBERS

LEONARDO DA VINCI: 500 YEARS TO SOON


FLYERS: BEFORE LEONARDO DA VINCI


THE FLYING MACHINE: CHINA 400 A.D.


FLYING MACHINE: AMERICA 1948 AD



COL. ROBERT L. SCOTT OF THE FLYING TIGERS, CIRCA 1920's
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SO, DID THE WANDERLING FLY?

Let Me Travel Through the Air Like a Winged Bird
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TARZAN AND THE HUNTRESS



THE WASHOE ZEPHYR




THE BLACK CONDOR




CLICK
HERE FOR
ENLIGHTENMENT

ON THE RAZOR'S
EDGE


E-MAIL
THE WANDERLING

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LEONARDO
DA--VINCI

RING SITE

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As to the subject of donations, for those of you who may be interested in doing so as it applies to the gratefulness of my works, I invariably suggest any funds be directed toward THE WOUNDED WARRIOR PROJECT and/or THE AMERICAN RED CROSS.

















Footnote [1]
















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