TAKING OUT THE FIRST MEATBALL



KENNETH M. TAYLOR, PEARL HARBOR, AND THE P-40


the Wanderling





BECAUSE PLANES FLEW OVER THE ISLAND OF OAHU AT ALL HOURS OF THE DAY AND NIGHT







HALEIWA SCRAMBLE: P-40 NO. 155, LT. KENNETH M. TAYLOR
DAN ZOENIG ILLUSTRATIONS

The last two pages of the the above illustrated story with a headline that reads "The First Jap Killer," published in 1944, came out during the height of all of the war hysteria. Although loaded with a number of now obvious discrepancies and even though the gist of the story is correct and the intent was honorable, it is blanketed with almost pure war time propaganda of the type that was being churned out by most of the propaganda machines of the era. As for discrepancies the most blatant is the Flying Tiger like shark teeth adorning his P-40. So too, the first Japanese plane he took out, although a "Meatball," it wasn't a Zero in the classical sense but an Aichi D3A "Val," the top carrier-borne dive bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) during World War II. Taylor didn't go up alone as stated in the blurb at the end of the final panel either. Actually, his flying teammate and buddy George S. Welch, in a sister P-40 carrying the buzz number 160, took off with him, the two of them flying together side by side until reaching enemy aircraft over Pearl Harbor whereupon they both engaged the Japanese, the only difference being of the two pilots Taylor was the first to pull out a Meatball. That day, in the sky, the two of them, defying direct orders when they came in to reload, downed a total of eight Japanese planes. Four other pilots besides just Taylor and Welch got off the ground and into the air that day, each taking on the Japanese in air-to-air combat with each pulling out more Meatballs.


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FOR THE NAME OF THE PILOTS WHO GOT IN THE AIR THAT
DAY AND THEIR NUMBER OF KILLS, PLEASE CLICK IMAGE

Below is a graphic showing a P-40B Warhawk carrying the fuselage number "155" as used by Lt Kenneth M.Taylor of the 47th Pursuit Squadron, USAAF, Haleiwa Auxiliary Airbase, Hawaii, to engage enemy aircraft in the sky over Pearl Harbor and the Island of Oahu on Sunday morning December 7, 1941.



GHOST P-40: LORE, LEGENDS AND HER WHEREABOUTS


TANGO SQUADRON AIR MUSEUM, CHIANG MAI


PEARL HARBOR P-40 GHOST SHIP


GENERAL CLAIRE L. CHENNAULT
NIPPONESE NEMESIS

DR. MARGARET 'MOM' CHUNG
FLYING TIGER RECRUITER, ADVOCATE, PHYSICIAN

GEORGE S. WELCH
BROKE THE SOUND BARRIER BEFORE YEAGER

P-40 WARHAWK
PEARL HARBOR SURVIVOR



E-MAIL
THE WANDERLING

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SO, DID THE WANDERLING FLY?

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As to the subject of donations, for those of you who may be interested in doing so as it applies to the gratefulness of my works, I invariably suggest any funds be directed toward THE WOUNDED WARRIOR PROJECT and/or THE AMERICAN RED CROSS.


















FIVE OF THE SIX USAAF PILOTS THAT GOT OFF THE GROUND DECEMBER 7, 1941

The following is from a plaque placed in Wheeler Field:

On the 7th of December 1941, Wheeler Field was the primary fighter base in the Pacific and a key target of the Japanese attack. At 0800 hours, waves of enemy planes bombed and strafed the flight line, the barracks and hangars. The resulting losses were 83 aircraft destroyed or damaged and 97 personnel killed or wounded. While the bulk of American fighter planes were caught on the ground, six pilots managed to get their aircraft airborne during the attack and, against overwhelming odds, scored the first American victories of the Second World War.


47th PURSUIT SQUADRON FLYING CURTISS P-40 WARHAWKS

Pilot ----------------------------------- Victories

2/Lt Kenneth M. Taylor---------------- 4

2/Lt George S. Welch------------------4

2/Lt Harry W. Brown ------------------ 1

46TH PURSUIT SQUADRON FLYING CURTISS P-36 HAWKS

Pilot------------------------------------Victories

1/Lt Lewis M. Saunders ------------- 1

2/Lt Philip M. Rasmussen----------- 1

2/Lt Gordon H. Sterling Jr.---------- 1

HAWAIIAN WARBIRD SURVIVORS