LOST SHIP IN THE DESERT







SEVEN CITIES OF CIBOLA


My uncle, because of his rather extensive travels in the desert southwest had, over time, developed a strong working knowledge and familiarity with most aspects of Native American rock art. I was barely under his tutelage and not even ten-years old before we started exploring the desert southwest together, or more as it most likely was in the beginning, he went and took me with him. One of our first major stops included actually going to one of Seven Cities of Cibola, the ruins of an ancient Zuni pueblo with the name Kyaki:Ma. We may have visited others of the seven or more, but of the seven I remember Kyaki:Ma for a highly specific reason.(see)

On a number of our ventures together at petroglyph sites he pointed out many petroglyphs as being decidedly different, and of which he said were not of Native American origin, but were instead ancient Chinese ideographs.

The question I asked my uncle was he in effect telling me that not only Vikings came up the Colorado River, but so too did the Chinese? His answer was: not necessarily. He said most likely they had come overland from the Pacific following established trails and routes used by the Native Americans for trade, probably led by guides or trailing a group of traders returning to the Colorado River area. From there he said they headed up river toward the Grand Canyon.


So said, scattered here and there within the numerous glyphs, pictograms, and etched markings in stone and elsewhere attributed to the indigenous populations of North America and Mexico are any number said to have been made by cultures other than those considered native. Those designated with having a significant possibility of being Chinese in origin are a big part of those discovered. Although people often see a strong Asian influence in the concentrated Mesoamerica cultures in the southern reaches of Mexico and the Yucatan there is, for some reason, an extraordinary amount of Chinese ideograms that seem to be located paralleling long portions of the Colorado River valley, especially so not far from where the Mojave Trail intersects with the river, which inturn entertains the possibility of early Chinese presence in the area.

Although to date no proven forms of Chinese writing similar to say the Kensington Stone have surfaced that actually tell a narrative, there are numerous individual ideograms that clearly resemble known Chinese characters, again many concentrated along the Colorado. Two such instances are located in Grapevine Canyon and near Searchlight, Nevada, north and south of each other paralleling the Colorado. See:

Now, while it is true the links could be taken with a grain of salt, especially the second one, I'm sure you get the picture. Again, why there are just individual glyphs scattered here and there and not a descriptive narrative of some type is not known. I have seen both the Kensington Stone and the Los Lunas Decalogue Stone and a whole lot of work would have to go into them --- plus, not only that, the person would have to possess the necessary carving skills so the glyphs would be accruate as well as being literate as well. I can't help but think any number of people crossing the desert carrying supplies for the contingent would not have the abilities to write. Maybe a pictograph here or there, but a whole narrative, questionable. The exalted Chinese monk, the 6th Patriarch of Zen, the venerable Hui Neng, was known to be illiterate. It wouldn't be totally beyond the realm of things that other monks and their supply bearers could find themselves in a similar quandary. See:


BUDDHISM IN AMERICA BEFORE COLUMBUS


UNCLE SCROOGE: FAULTY FORTUNE


RETURN TO:

KLONDIKE BIG INCH LAND COMPANY

VIKINGS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST


GERMAN SUBMARINE ATTACK ON HOOVER DAM


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