SPOTTING THE ENEMY FORMATION, ED LEADS
HIS MEN INTO A SCREAMING DIVE.....
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THE LONE TIGER


the Wanderling

Just before America entered World War II Ed Hill, as the story is written and shown below, was a squadron leader with the American Volunteer Group, the A.V.G., more commonly known as the Flying Tigers, fighting alongside Chiang Kai-shek's troops for a free China. On the second scramble of a given day, right after pulling a Zero out of the sky as shown above, his P-40 was attacked from behind. No bullets struck him directly, but several others passed through the cockpit shattering the instrument panel and damaging his controls. He was forced to make a rough belly-landing in the jungle, in the process wrecking his craft and being rendered unconscious. When he awakened he found himself in the compound of a powerful masked local warlord called Wu Fang. As well, all of his wounds were bandaged and injuries treated.

The warlord had Hill's plane repaired to full and complete combat ready flight status. Then, he found himself more or less indentured, forced to become the pilot in the only plane in the warlord's air force, Hill's P-40. On a combat mission for the warlord he ran out of fuel and had to make a forced-stick landing, realizing the warlord restricted his fuel supply to reduce any chance of escape. In the middle of the night a group of guerillas opposed to the warlord breaks Hill out of his cell, escaping in his plane to the guerilla stronghold. Not long afterwards, the Japanese, in their forward march, sweep up large tracts of territory surrounding the guerillas who remain virtually unknown. About the same time he arrives at the stronghold he hears on the radio that the Flying Tigers were disbanded and all the pilots and crew sent home. From a secret airstrip hewed out of the mountains by the guerillas and the rest of the Flying Tigers gone, Hill continues to wage a fight against the Japanese, becoming the Lone Tiger. Below is the Lone Tiger's origin story as found in Warfront #37, September 1966 with art by Wally Wood:













In the above main comic-text, our hero Ed Hill, the Lone Tiger, is saved and returned to health via the assist of a masked warlord calling himself Wu Fang. Wu Fang, although vying for maintaining the control and expansion of his own territory against the Japanese invaders, is not doing so for the betterment of China and it isn't long before the Lone Tiger escapes the warlord's clutches and jumps ship to the Free China side. As for myself, on more than one occasion during my lifetime I have found myself in situations where I have had run-ins with Asian warlords. Please see:


MEETING WARLORDS, ET AL


KHUN SA: THE SECOND WARLORD


The panels on the page above depicting the adventures of the Lone Tiger, as mentioned previously, were drawn by master artist-cartoonist Wally Wood. Wood also drew an absolutely fabulous renditioned Flying Tigers stand alone story called "Ordeal" published in 1955 for an EC Comic titled Aces High. See the following:


FLYING TIGERS
THE ORDEAL OF LIEUTENANT STONER

Although the Lone Tiger and the P-40s in "Ordeal" are drawn and presented in a serious tone, Wood was a one-time major cartoonist for Mad Comics. One of his most famous stories is a spoof on Terry and the Pirates called Teddy and the Pirates. Milton Caniff, who himself was famous for drawing Terry and the Pirates had in his mix of characters a woman he called the Dragon Lady, based on a real-life warlord of the seas, a pirate queen by the name of Lai Choi San. When the person I call my Mentor in all my works was a young man he was traveling back to India from the Himalayas overland through China. He departed China towards the Philippines via the south China by sea. In doing so, after meeting Lai Choi San, he traveled on one of heavily her armed junks and got to know her fairly well, of which, over time he related to me. In Woods satirical rendition of Terry and the Pirates he draws my all time favorite visual presentation of the Dragon Lady who he calls the Dragging Lady:


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(for larger graphic click image then click again)

TERRY AND THE PIRATES


AND NOW THIS:

DESTRUCTION OF THE HUITONG BRIDGE

In keeping with the destruction of the road by the Lone Tiger as depicted in the last panels above, after Burma (Myanmar) was occupied by the enemy, and with the Flying Tigers still in play, in order to prevent the invasion of the Japanese army to the east of the Salween River, the Huitong Bridge was bombed to cut off the Yunnan-Myanmar Highway, known as the Burma Road. Please see Footnote [1].



P-40 WARHAWK
PEARL HARBOR SURVIVOR

P-40 GOOSE SHOOT


GHOST AND HAUNTED B-29


P-40: THE OBSOLETE WAR HERO


THE ART OF WALLY WOOD


THE FLYING TIGERS
THE BOY IN THE MAN REMEMBERS THE LEGEND


TOMMY TOMAHAWK P-40 TOMAHAWK SQUADRON

(please click image)


DID THE WANDERLING FLY?

(please click)



CLICK
HERE FOR
ENLIGHTENMENT

ON THE RAZOR'S
EDGE


E-MAIL
THE WANDERLING

(please click)




As to the subject of donations, for those of you who may be interested in doing so as it applies to the gratefulness of my works, I invariably suggest any funds be directed toward THE WOUNDED WARRIOR PROJECT and/or THE AMERICAN RED CROSS.


















Footnote [1]


DESTRUCTION OF THE HUITONG BRIDGE

Both up to and long after the Flying Tigers left Burma the Japanese continued to take over and solidify huge swaths of Southeast Asia on their way toward India. In 1942-1943, not long after the Flying Tigers departed and with the war still raging, a book titled The Lady and the Tigers was published, written by a woman by the name of Olga Greenlaw. Greenlaw had been an integral part of the American Volunteer Group operations, otherwise known as the A.V.G. or Flying Tigers, from the very beginning right up to the end. After the group was disbanded and on her way home to the states, albeit while still in India Greenlaw wrote:


"The Calcutta newspapers annoyed me. I noticed how they were building up the R.A.F. and the new American Tenth Air Force and giving the A.V.G. slight credit --- if at all. I found one story --- about the Jap Advance toward Yunnan Province --- particularly irksome:

THE DRIVE TOWARD PAOSHAN

In north-east Burma another border battle is taking place, and the Japanese vanguards thrusting up the Burma Road are 60 miles to the west of Paoshan, 200 miles inside the Yunnan border. The Chinese have destroyed the bridges across the Salween River and are holding the east bank. Small parties of Chinese appear to be operating in many directions up the Burma Road, and guerilla warfare stages appears to have been reached.

"On and on it went. The whole thing is so familiar to me. No mention of the A.V.G., who were the one who had destroyed the large bridge across the Salween by dropping bombs."



THE GORGE, THE BURMA ROAD, THE SALWEEN RIVER, AND THE HUITONG BRIDGE


An equally tantalizing synopsis that quickly and accurately sums up the whole Huitong Bridge thing in one paragraph, albeit a tad more dramatic and exciting than Olga's account of the same event --- but written historically sometime afterwards --- can be found in a descriptive analysis accompanying Tigers in the Gorge by by John D. Shaw --- the Gorge being of course as shown in the above graphic along the Salween River and Tigers being the Flying Tigers:


"Thousands of refugees fled down the tortuous Burma Road toward Kunming, China to escape the advancing armored forces of Imperial Japan. With the armies of china devastated, it was evident that nothing but the winding Salween River at the bottom of the treacherous gorge could slow the enemy's surge toward the capitol city. After destroying the bridge behind them, those fleeing watched helplessly as the Japanese hastily started to construct a makeshift pontoon bridge. It appeared that China would face certain surrender if the enemy made it across. Hopes of an easy victory quickly began to fade through, when suddenly through the gorge rang the echoes of snarling Allison engines, powering shark mouthed P-40s of the legendary American Volunteer Group, better known as the Flying Tigers! With 'Tex' Hill leading the charge, and with only a handful of men and planes, the AVG stopped the Japanese cold in the Salween River Gorge, and China would not fall."(see)


For those who may be so interested I have provided an access-link to a free and complete PDF online version of Olga Greenlaw's book by going to the The Lady and the Tigers link below. By all measures most who came across her or knew her, she was invariably considered exotic, beautiful, covertly cunning and provocatively ingenuous. For others who simply cast the smart-as-a-whip Greenlaw's preeminent standing in the Flying Tigers as being based solely on her marriage to Colonel Harvey Greenlaw, the second in command of the Flying Tigers, they were usually in for a rude awakening. Even if such was the case initially, over time, because of who she was, the right person in the right place at the right time, it wasn't long before her being there took on a life of it's own.



OLGA GREENLAW


JAPANESE INVASION OF INDIA DURING
WORLD WAR II


THE TEA-HORSE TRADE ROUTE


THE LADY AND THE TIGERS



















Under the cover of darkness, on the night of May 11, 1944, after more than a two-year ordeal of fully armed Japanese and lesser-so Chinese troops facing each other over the Salween River, the Chinese Expeditionary Army mounted a full-scale river crossing counter-offensive. On the first day 40,000 troops crossed the river using nearly 400 American supplied rubber boats and countless handmade bamboo rafts. In the next few days 60,000 more troops and thousands of pack animals carrying supplies crossed the river. The counter-offensive was successful and the Japanese troops retreated, most to their Songshan base. One month before the Japanese had thrown a major thrust of combatants westward into India, now behind them a major contingency of well trained and well armed Chinese troops were positioning themselves to come in on their less defendable and more open rear as well as cutting off their supply lines. William Samuel was an American imbedded with the Chinese troops. Samuel, who went on to fight in the Korean War, writes, speaking of China and World War II:


"I was, after all, a captain of infantry in two long wars. I lived with Chinese infantry troops in the field for nearly three years---subsisting with them, nearly starving with them. The few American soldiers in China had very little support from the United States during World War II. We were at the end of the world's longest supply line, and anything that reached us from home had been flown over Japanese occupied countries, over the great Himalayan Mountains into Kunming, thence to be trucked and packed in by animals to us, wherever we might be."


A SOLDIER'S STORY


GENERAL JOSEPH STILWELL


WILLIAM SAMUEL & FRIENDS: A SECRET REVEALED


RALPH A. MULTER
GUNNER'S MATE 3rd CLASS, U.S. NAVY