SHIPS THAT PASS IN THE DESERT SANDS


CHORAL PEPPER



There is some discrepancy regarding the shields. Pepper relates to us in the above article that she interviewed Myrtle Botts in the late 1960's. As found in the article Vikings of the Desert Southwest, Botts, during an interview with the Wanderling in 1970, told him that on the side of the ship she was on there were no signs of any shields visible, only markings, four deep, where they were once attached. Santiago Socia, in his initial reports to his wife, told her there were metal disks on the side of the ship he saw. However, what he had with him when he returned home after a long day of searching was a weathered round wooden shield his wife said was twice the size of a large tortilla.

According to the book Lost Gold and Silver Mines of the West (1963), by Eugene L. Conrotto, from DESERT MAGAZINE, January, 1939 in an article by Charles C. Niehuis, Niehuis had interviewed the widow of Santiago Socia, Petra Socia Tucker. She was visiting her second husband Jim Tucker at the Arizona Pioneer's Home in Prescott and told Niehuis it was her first husband, Santiago Socia, that saw and knew the ship's location. Socia had told her it was in a narrow box canyon with sheer high walls and a sandy bottom. He said, "partially buried there was a boat of ancient appearance --- an open boat but big, with round metal disks on its sides."



Disregarding Santiago Socia Socia returning with a weathered round wooden shield twice the size of a large tortilla instead of one made of metal or none at all, Choral Pepper more-or-less offers-up a shorter few paragraph version of the much longer Niehuis' 1939 Desert Magazine article about the metal shields linked above. In her November 1980 Desert Magazine article above, Pepper, long in time removed from the original source, runs with the part of the story Socia informs his wife he saw "a boat of ancient appearance, an open boat but big, with round metal disks on its sides" even though it was a wooden shield he brought home.

Vikings were known to use wooden shields not metal ones. If Socia saw "disks" on the side of the ship, even though Botts said there were none, they may have appeared to be metal, but most likely would have to had been wood if the vessel he found was indeed of Viking origin. Socia's comments, albeit seen to be possibly contradicting on the surface, does bring a wooden shield into the picture and prominently so after the fact of metal ones because not only did he see and bring home a wooden shield, but his wife reports having seen the wooden shield herself at well, making it for me way more than simply just talk.

If you remember from Vikings of the Desert Southwest, as found on that page's Footnote [3], it was because of a potential Viking shield, a wooden Viking shield, I was shot at by a bunch of pothunters, barely escaping with my life in a remote canyon in the Anza-Borrego Desert. If it hadn't been for an unexpected desert sandstorm I could have been a dead man.(see)


SHIP IN THE DESERT

GENE AUTRY COMICS, JUNE 1951 ISSUE #52

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LOST SHIP OF THE DESERT

UNCLE SCROOGE COMICS, SEPTEMBER 1954 ISSUE #7

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THE DESERT SHIP: A LEGEND, OR TWO

THE WESTERNER COMICS, DECEMBER 1950 ISSUE #31

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SEE:


DESERT SHIPS, SPANISH TREASURE, AND COLORADO RIVER FLOODS


LOST SHIP OF THE DESERT: DESERT MAGAZINE/USA TODAY


EARLY COLORADO RIVER STEAMBOAT LANDINGS


THE COLORADO RIVER: WAS IT NAVIGABLE?


VIKINGS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST


THE KENSINGTON STONE
THE CASE FOR NORSEMEN IN AMERICA
BEFORE COLUMBUS

COTTONWOOD ISLAND



CLICK
HERE FOR
ENLIGHTENMENT

ON THE RAZOR'S
EDGE


E-MAIL
THE WANDERLING

(please click)


SOURCE:
DESERT MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 1980


CHORAL PEPPER OBITUARY


As to the subject of donations, for those who may be so interested as it applies to the gratefulness of my works, I invariably suggest any funds be directed toward THE WOUNDED WARRIOR PROJECT and/or THE AMERICAN RED CROSS.